What Is The VORC Score?

For the current year, I have enhanced the way the players are ordered in Draft Mode based on the four key stats - Value, Outlook, Reliability, Consistency. 

You will only get the VORC score while in Draft Mode because the Value score is based on your draft pick for each round. 

Here is how the score is calculated.

VALUE - The Value score is calculated from your draft pick # less the player value rank.  So if you have pick #25 and the player has a value rank of #18, that player will receive 7 points on the VORC Score.  A positive score means the player is undervalued, a negative score means the player is overvalued.  The Value score maxes out at +30 points and the lowest value score is -20.   Tight Ends are chronically overvalued, so they receive +10 value points

OUTLOOK - The Outlook is calculated by positive and negative criteria about the player's intangibles.  Positive criteria adds stars, negative criteria subtracts stars.  The maximum score is 5 stars and the minimum score is one star.  The VORC score calculates points based on how many stars they earn:  Five Stars gets 20 points, Four Stars gets 15 points, Three Stars gets 10 points, Two Stars gets 0 points and One Star gets -20 points.

RELIABILITY - A player is scored on reliability based on how many games they've missed, on average, over the past three seasons.  If a player misses an average of less than 2 games per season, they have High Reliability.  If a player averages between 2-4 missed games/season they receive Mid Reliability.  If they average 4 or more games/season they get Low Reliability.  A player receives 20 points for High Reliability, 10 Points for Mid Reliability and -10 points for Low Reliability.  Rookies receive 0 points for reliability.

CONSISTENCY - Consistency is a measure of the players usage on a game to game basis during the previous season.  Basically it's the variance in their usage divided by the number of games played and then each position is ranked.  If you score in the top 10% of all players of the same type you get a 10, If you are in the next 10% you get a 9, etc. etc.  If you score a 10 or 9, you get 20 points.  If you score 8 or 7, you get 15 points.  If you get 6 or 5, you get 10 points.  If you get 4 or 3, you get 0 points.  If you score 2 or 1, you get -10 points.  If you're a rookie or didn't get at least 60 opportunities with the ball during the prior season, you get zero points.

So the highest score a player can receive is 90 points and the worst score is -60 points.  These are also relative scores based on what round you're looking at.  So a player in the first round and a player in the 10th round might have the same VORC score but the first round players are being ranked according to your draft pick #5 but the 10th round players are are being based on you draft pick #116.  That's why you only see the VORC score in Draft Mode.

If you hover over the VORC score you will see the breakdown of how that player scored on each of these four stats.

The VORC score is designed to savagely punish players that don't score well on any of the criteria, that is why there are negative scores on all four of the critical stats.

Finally, each round in Draft Mode has some crossover with the round before and the round after.  Players that have less than a 50% chance of being available in this round are considered LONGSHOTS, they have a pistol appear next to their name.  If a longshot is still available and they have a higher VORC score than the recommended players, take that player.  In the above example, you see both Saquon Barkley and Ezekiel Elliott as Longshots because their Expected Draft Position is earlier than the draft position #5.

You will also see players with a REACH icon next to their name.  The REACH icon will appear for those players whose Expected Draft Position is very close to your next round pick.  The players listed with a REACH designation on one round will usually be LONGSHOTS on the next round.  You can also see Tyreek Hill as the second highest VORC score on the list.  The blue hands indicate he is a Reach because his Expected Draft Position of  #16 is the same as your second pick, so Hill will be considered a Longshot for the second round.  In this case it would be very hard for me to justify passing on Alvin Kamara for Tyreek Hill as my first pick, but sometimes the Reaches will have the highest VORC score and you'll have to make a decision as to whether you take them a round early or gamble and hope they make it to the next pick.

I also provide you with the top 3 recommended players, they are the three players with the highest VORC score that are not longshots.